CVPM Quiz & Distance Formula

Today in Physics we worked on the Unit 1 Quiz. I modified it slightly by adding one questions asking students to differentiate between speed and velocity and on the back I created a motion map and asked students to write a scientifically accurate, yet entertaining story. That was a great idea. The kids liked it and it boosted my morale during grading.

During Geometry we finished the distance formula sheet that I made. I put a picture of the school on the page with a grid overlaid on it (that took forever, I ended up having to put a picture into Word and putting a table in front of it). They totally got into it after I opened up the lesson with a few Dan Meyer-esque questions having them predict various distances around the campus. This was totally a lesson I will repeat next year.

After that we worked on an activity that extended the distance formula to special quadrilaterals. And the students hated it. Applying the distance formula to each side of a quadrilateral is not exactly their definition of a good time. Students started acting out during lecture after we had been working on the same thing for an hour or so, but Instead of complaining I just wanted to take this time to remind my fellow teachers that, when dealing with behavior issues, first look at your practices before you move to the students. That lesson I have today was horrible, I lectured for way too long and the subsequent activity had no real-world connections or interesting connections. I was even bored and I love math. Why are we surprised that our students aren’t interested when we aren’t?

So I scrapped the plan on continuing this lesson next time and am going on to a lesson involving diagonals of polygons that I am much more excited about. Once student’s interest is peaked the behavior issues die out.

##CVPM ##setbacks

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s